Mark LITHIUM


A DOSAGE FORM






Sherae Rimpsey | Julia Pello & David Hall | Máiréad Delaney
November 10, 2017



The works presented will be more or less new works. Some may take up the aesthetics and modes of performance more than others. Others might be lifted through method or form – performance as per form. Works continuous and elaborate, works discontinuous and truncated. Still, works as in more than one and more than one working. So, the labor of the work, the working body, and the working of attention – attention is worked and it is paid. Paying attention allows the work to more or less appear ecstatic at the precise moment of viewing, or to be more or less ecstatic once it disappears and is forgotten.

LITHIUM will present A Dosage Form, a performance night co-curated with David Hall, in the form of a dosage-free capsule for the works and the labors: Sherae Rimpsey, Julia Pello & David Hall, and Máiréad Delaney on November 10, 6 to 9PM. Though empty, it is certainly not void. It encapsulates air, space, and time.

Sherae Rimpsey is an interdisciplinary artist. She has exhibited her work internationally, most notably at the Center for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw, Poland; Zentral Bibliothek in Zurich, Switzerland and National Library of Buenos Aires, Argentina as a contributing artist in Luis Camnitzer’s El Ultimo Libro – The Last Book project; and the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany where she was awarded the prestigious Solitude Fellowship and was an artist in residence there from October 2008 – December 2009. She is the recipient of a Philadelphia Foundation Grant and a Vermont Studio Center Artist Grant and Residency. She received her BFA in Technology & Integrated Media with an emphasis in Visual Culture from the Cleveland Institute of Art and an MFA in Writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Julia Pello is Russia-born writer and film/video maker. Pello’s video work engages emptied sites of historical memory to investigate possibilities of encountering what is no longer materially present. In attempting to formulate a visual record of historical disappearance, she explores eroded materialities, abandoned cityscapes, and interstitial spaces—paying attention to the interplay of collective and individual desire upon those sites. A hauntology of the moving image in all that it can and cannot contain within its frame. Slow-elapsing and durational, Pello’s videos mediate a space between the actual and the virtual. Audio-visual, cinematic spaces become sites where the subjective task of the watcher/listener is to respond to the durational effect of the work by confronting its beingness within time. Cartographic ghost plays in which the image goes where language cannot follow and vice-versa, where transcendence manifests its sleight of hand as pure immanence—a salve of now.

David Hall writes in sentences and often works with materials already charged with significance. The particular tendencies of his practice and process often take shape in
the form of presentational modes, performative lectures, curatorial labor, and heavily mediated performances. He has exhibited and performed his work nationally and inter-
nationally and received an MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Máiréad Delaney is an Irish-American artist working transatlantically in performance and installation. She explores how gendered bodies respond to the unleashing of systemic violence. Delaney studied at the postgraduate level in Ireland, working with the Irish women’s collective Survivors of Symphysiotomy. Delaney has exhibited internationally, in New York, Ireland and the UK, and Ethiopia. She has presented work in the 2015 Dublin Live Art Festival and BIPAF, at the Queen’s Museum, Grace Exhibition Space, Panoply Performance Laboratory, for Dublin’s Livestock and with Dublin-based collective Pre-form and Bbeyond at the Ulster Museum in Belfast. She has also made a series of public performances entitled ‘Hold Harmless,’ outside the National Maternity Hospital and the Four Courts in Dublin.

November 2017